Crosley Field Pt.1 (demolished) - Cincinnati, Ohio
Ballparks, Arenas and Stadiums > Crosley Field Pt.1 (demolished) - Cincinnati, Ohio
Music - transfer station blue by Michael Shrieve

Photographed in 1987 and 1991 using film.

DISCLAIMER - Photos WITHOUT my red watermark on them are not mine. They were found on the internet, and ARE NOT FOR SALE.

Crosley Field - Opened on April 11, 1912 and closed on June 24, 1970. Demolished in 1972. Seven buildings now occupy the site.

Known as Redland Field 1912 - 1933, Crosley Field 1933 - 1970.

Location - Findlay Street and Western Avenue Cincinnati, Ohio

Crosley Field has been somewhat rebuilt in the town of Blue Ash Ohio. The city rebuilt it as a community baseball complex. They have the same outfield dimensions, replica scoreboard, 400 Crosley field seats and a ticket booth. Blue Ash is north east of Cincinnati.

Baseball had been played at the corner of Findlay and York from 1884 till 1970. The park started out as League Park from 1884 till 1901. From 1902 until 1911 it was called Palace of the fans. The park was demolished after the 1911 season. Up sprang Redland field in 1912. It was renamed Crosley Field (for Reds owner Powell Crosley) in 1934. Typical of the parks during that era, Crosley had quirky dimensions. The most notorious feature at Crosley was "the terrace" in left field. It was a 15 degree incline, much like Duffy's Cliff at Fenway Park. Many an outfielder, both visiting and Reds, stumbled running up hill. Crosley was a hitters park with very friendly dimensions. The most visible feature was the huge scoreboard in left center, with the longines clock on top. As most of you know, Crosley Field was the first major league park to put in lights. On May 24, 1935 President Franklin Roosevelt pushed a button in the White House and the lights at Crosley came on for the first time. The Reds beat the Phillies that night 2-1 and baseball would be forever changed. Crosley field was also the smallest in capacity, never having more than 33,00 seats. Most of the time the seating was around 29.000. Like just about all the parks that were built at the turn of the century, Crosley began to develop problems. Parking being the biggest headache. Suburbia was creeping in too as I-75 was built just beyond the centerfield wall. The cozy little park in west Cincinnati was doomed. The last hurrah was on June 24, 1970 as the Reds beat the Giants 5-4. For the record, the last home run ever at Crosley was hit by Reds first baseman Lee May in the bottom of the 8th. Johnny Bench had homered as the previous batter. The curtain had finally come down after 86 years at Findlay and York. The old park was closed for good after the final game. It became an impound lot for cars by the city of Cincinnati. On April 19, 1972, the wrecking ball began to demolish the old home of the Reds. If you go to that area, you will find where home plate is and a few seats from Crosley. Many a Reds fan wish they could go back in time and sit in the right field sun deck (for a day game) or moon deck (for a night game) and watch their team again.
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Map of where a Crosley Field replica is. Blue Ash, Ohio


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Model of Crosley at the Reds hall of fame.


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Turnstile from Crosley at Reds HOF.


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Old Crosley Field lockers at Reds HOF.


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Crosley Field seat for sale at Reds HOF store.


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Site of where Crosley was.


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The next set of photos are in Blue Ash, Ohio. Where a replica of Crosley exists.


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The last at bat ever at Crosley.


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The Reds and Giants walk off Crosley for the last time.


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Crosley turns into an impound yard after the Reds left.


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The press box on the roof at Crosley.


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This was the press lounge on the roof of Crosley.


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Crosley in its final stages.


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The beginning of the end for Crosley.


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