Comerica Park - Detroit, Michigan
Ballparks, Arenas and Stadiums > Comerica Park - Detroit, Michigan
MUSIC - Ball of confusion by the Temptations

Photographed in 2003 using film.

Comerica Park - Opened April 11, 2000 and is still in use.

Location - 2100 Woodward Ave. Detroit, Michigan -- Bounded by E. Montcalm St., Brush St., Adams Ave.

Located in the "Foxtown" section of downtown Detroit at 2100 Woodward Avenue. The Fox theater is located on Woodward Avenue, directly across the street from Comerica Park. Ford field (home to the NFL Detroit Lions) is directly in back of left field. It is one of the new age of ballparks. A lot more leg room, less seats, no poles obstructing the views. The ballpark opened in 2000.

The first ever Tiger's game was on April 11, 2000. The Tigers defeated the Seattle Mariners 5-2. In an odd twist, Brian Moehler was the winning pitcher, just as he was the winning pitcher in the last ever game at old Tiger Stadium. The first home run was not hit till April 14. Juan Gonzalez hit a 3 run home run off Tampa Bay's Ryan Rupe in the 3rd inning.

To be honest, its a nice park in my mind. They have a Ferris wheel decorated with baseball's as cars, and a merry go-round. To me, they don't belong in a ballpark. Another over the top feature are the tiger's (the animal kind) statues everywhere. You see them when you enter the park, they are on the scoreboard, and on the facings of the front of the park. One nice touch at Comerica is the area in center field where all the Tigers greats have their statues. Ty Cobb. Hal Newhouser, Al Kaline, Charlie Gehringer, Willie Horton, and Hank Greenberg.

Comerica park hosted both the all-star game in 2005, and the world series in 2006. On June 12th 2007, Justin Verlander threw the first no-hitter at Comerica Park. He beat the Milwaukee Brewers 4-0.

My personal opinion of the park is this. It's a nice yard. Lots more leg room, more room in the concourse. No obstructed views, great sightlines. It is part of the revitalization of Detroit. Tiger stadium had its problems. Obstructed views, no legroom, cramped concourse, bad area of town. BUT... Tiger stadium had the ballpark aura. You could feel the history in her. You could smell the hot dogs and stale beer, and in the days gone by, the smell of cigars. As Tiger stadium was a relic from baseball's past, Comerica is a modern park with all the comforts new stadiums provide.
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Looking at Comerica Park from Woodward Ave. July 2003


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The main entrance to Comerica. July 03


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The entrance. Notice the ABUNDANCE of Tiger statues.


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More of the over used Tiger statues. You can see the gargoyles disguised as tigers heads on the corners and pillars of the building.


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The main entrance. Again, more Tigers heads. July 03


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There is NO reason for a merry-go-round in a ballpark.


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Looking towards left field.


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You can see the white roof of Ford field in back of the left field roof.


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The view from the upper deck behind home plate. July 03


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Looking towards downtown Detroit. The building to the left with the whale mural is the abandoned Broderick tower building. As of 2007, they are refurbishing the building, making high priced condos on the top floors.


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A view from right centerfield.


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A closer view of the Broderick towers builiding in center field. July 03


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The Kaline's corner of Comerica park.


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The bullpen in right center field.


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The huge outfield looking towards third base.


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The right field foul pole and view of the scoreboard in left.


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The famous Fox theater at 2211 Woodward Avenue. Built in 1928, it was showing its age and neglect. In 1988, the theater was completely refurbished and cleaned, and is one of the new jewels of downtown Detroit.


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The view of the Fox theater and hockeytown cafe from the first base upper deck.


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A great view of the left field scoreboard. Notice the tigers heads on the scoreboard. The eyes glow when a Tiger hits a home run.


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A smaller upper deck than in old Tiger stadium.


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Left field upper deck looking towards home plate.


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The Hockeytown cafe. Right next door to the Fox theater. Great place to go before and after the game. Lots of Red Wings memorobelia (shocking I know!). They even have some old artifacts from the old Olympia stadium, where the Red Wings played from 1927 - 1979.


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A skyline shot from left field.


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A reversed view of the main entrance.. looking towards the Fox theater and Woodward Ave.


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Willie Horton statue to the right, Ty Cobb is to the left of Horton's statue.


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The first statue is of Al Kaline, Hal Newhouser is next to Kaline's statue.


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The flagpole in dead center field that used to be in play until 2002, when the Tigers moved the fences in.


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A box seat view of Comerica park with a thunderstorm looming over the city. July 03


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Comerica park at night. The Tigers lost some soul when they moved to the new digs. Comerica will NEVER come close to being what Tiger stadium was. Tiger stadium had a heart, and soul. Comerica is all corporate and bells and whistles. Kids would rather play on the ferris wheel and merry go round than watch baseball. As a kid, I would NEVER have wanted to do that. If you want to take your kids to an amusement park, then take them to Disneyland, and if you take them to a baseball game, make sure there are no carnival attractions to distract your kids. On a scale of 1 to 10, Comerica gets a 6.