Tiger Stadium 2003 - Detroit, Michigan
Ballparks, Arenas and Stadiums > Tiger Stadium 2003 - Detroit, Michigan
MUSIC - Roll me away by Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet band

Location - 2121 Trumbull Ave., Detroit, Michigan Bounded by Michigan Ave., Cochrane St.

Tiger Stadium - most of the park was demolished in the summer of 2008. The final demolition took place in 2009. All that is left is the flagpole in centerfield and the diamond outline.

Tiger Stadium, July 2003, waiting for the wrecking ball. Baseball has been played at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull since 1901. Known originally as Bennett park. Named for Tiger catcher Charlie Bennett, who lost both legs in a horrific train accident in 1896. Built on the site of a former haymarket. The field was originally laid over cobblestones. The original site of home plate was in right field. It was rebuilt as Navin Field (later Tiger Stadium) in 1912, with the playing field turned 90 degrees.

On June 15, 1948, Tiger stadium hosted its first ever night game. Prior to Wrigley field in 1988, Tiger stadium was the last park to put in lights. Designed by Osborne engineering, the same company that designed Yankee Stadium in New York. It was also the home to the Detroit Lions. The Lions played at the corner from 1938 till 1974, when they moved to the Silverdome in Pontiac Michigan.

The last ever Tigers game was September 27th 1999. The Tigers beat the Kansas City Royals 8-2. The winning pitcher was Brian Moehler and the last homerun was a grand slam hit by Tiger's DH Robert Fick. Home to Tiger greats, Ty Cobb, Harry Heilmann, Al Kaline, Hank Greenberg, Charlie Gehringer, "Wahoo" Sam Crawford, George Kell, "Wild" Bill Donavan, Dizzy Trout, Prince Hal Newhouser, Norm Cash, Mickey Lolich, Bill Freehan, Willie Horton, Mark "the bird" Fidrych, Kirk Gibson, Alan Trammell, Lou Whitaker, and the last 30 game winner... Denny McLain..... It is indeed SACRED GROUND!

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The corner of Michigan and Trumbull in the Corktown section of Detroit. June 03


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Photo from internet.


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Shutters drawn, tickets for sale NO MORE. June 03


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2121 Trumbull Street, the Tigers offices address.


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At the "corner" Michigan and Trumbull.


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The centerfield bleachers entrance at the corner of Trumbull and Cherry Streets.


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Looking down Cochrane Street, the third base side of Tiger Stadium.


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Back view of center field.


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An abandoned home plate and press elevator. 6/03


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The exterior concession stands. Closed for good.


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The corktown tavern... just a pop fly away from Tiger stadium.


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The Tigers offices from Trumbull street.


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The Corktown tavern and Tiger Stadium. The brown brick building used to be a restaurant. Now it's closed and abandoned.


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The abandoned will call ticket booths off Trumbull Street.


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The left field bleachers entrance from Cochrane street.


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First base side of Tiger stadium from Michigan Ave. You can see the cobblestone streets partially paved over.


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Tiger plaza and office entrance.


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The Tiger plaques by the office entrance. They have since been removed.


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The right field overhang from Trumbull street.


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Ticket window at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull.


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The ravages of harsh Michigan winters take their toll on the pressbox and Tigers den seats.


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The cramped visitors dugout.


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The reserved seats above first base.


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Another view of the visitors dugout.


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The last right field roof homerun was the last homerun hit at Tiger stadium in the last game. A grand slam by Robert Fick hit the top of the roof and bounced back on the field. Al in all 11,111 home runs were hit at Tiger stadium.


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The skin peeling away from the upperdeck pressbox.


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You can almost picture Al Kaline tracking down a fly in right field.


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The long forgotton third base auxiliary scoreboard.


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Winter is not kind to the Tigers den seats. Neither are the vandals who have cut out the old English D from the backs of some of the seats.


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These were the "premium" tigers den seats. Soon to be removed and sold.


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The girders of the upper deck.


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The decay of the jumbotron scoreboard.


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No more hot dogs or beers from this long abandoned concession stand.


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Turnstiles eerily await the wrecking ball.


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It is a mere 440 feet to "dead" center.


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Where mustard and ketchup bottles once stood. Now silent and dirty.


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This is the concourse behind homeplate, now dark and long forgotten.


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Light towers sit waiting for the next night game that will never come.


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Pressbox views of right field.


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The best seats in the house. From the press box behind home plate.


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The football pressbox view down the right field line.


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From the pressbox, you can still see the outline of the diamond.


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Rusting girders in right field.


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The catwalks of the upper deck.


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The view from centerfield, you can still imagine the ghosts of Tiger greats who roamed this vast area.


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From afar, the field dosen't look too bad.


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The press lounge. It was simple. A coke machine now stands vacant.


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The media pressbox. A fire here February 1st 1977 destroyed the old pressbox and part of the upper deck.


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The scoreboard equipment lay in ruin.


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The roof from the press elevator.


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Only a few balls were ever hit on the left field roof. The last to do it was Cecil Fielder of the Tigers.


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Only 4 players ever cleared the left field roof at Tiger Stadium. Harmon Killebrew of the Twins, Frank Howard of the Senators, Mark McGwire of the A's and Cecil Fielder, the only Tiger to do it.


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The field from the football pressbox.


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Lower box seats behind third base.


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The Tigers dugout. If you were over 6 feet tall, you would bang your head on the roof of the dugout.


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This is the bunker, errr bullpen area. The players used to call the bullpen the bunker.


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A dirty abandoned bench in the Tigers dugout.


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A view of the left field stands from first base.


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The exit to Michigan and Cochrane streets.


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Mickey Lolich, Schoolboy Rowe, Virgil Trucks, Jack Morris and the greatest Tiger pitcher ever, Hal Newhouser, all pitched from this mound.


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A cathedral like view from the mound. The pressbox appears like a ghostly sentinal waiting for its final call.


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A concession stand in the background and dusty reserved seats behind first base.


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The 10 foot overhang above the right field fence.


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The overhang waits for another fly ball home run, that will never come.


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To the left in the picture, the transformer on the roof that Reggie Jackson hit in the 1971 all star game.


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The "CRAMPED" visitors dugout again.


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Your view from the lower grand stands in right field.


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Lots of balls have flown over the right field roof. Stormin Norman Cash led the way with 4, Mickey Mantle had 3.


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The view Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker had for 19 years.


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How many millions of fans have passed thru this very tunnel to their seats? Now it stands empty.


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Abandoned telephone booths with no phones. This area is behind home plate.


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Weather beaten Tigers den box seats.


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Peeling paint drops down from the upper deck.


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Underneath the third base stands.


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Obstructed view from behind home plate.


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The Tigers bullpen down the left field line.


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Lolich, Kaline, Cobb, Freehan, Greenberg, they all used this clubhouse.


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Inside the abandoned Tigers clubhouse. Tiles falling down, pipes had burst. It is a real mess. Hard to believe this was once a beehive of activity on gameday.


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Part of the equipment room. Notice the wall safes to the left.


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A corner of the abandoned Tigers clubhouse.


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The clubhouse was not very luxurious by today's standards. It was a very cramped room.


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How many Tiger greats used these lockers?


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Cramped showers in the Tigers old clubhouse.


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This used to be the trainers room in the Tigers clubhouse.


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Former general manager Jim Campbell's old office.


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Walter Briggs plush office. He owned the Tigers from 1935 to 1952.


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His son Walter Briggs Junior owned the Tigers from 1952 till 1956.


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Inside the Tigers general offices.


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You can see the long abandoned Michigan central depot in the background.


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Another abandoned plaza view.


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No more hot dogs, cokes, peanuts or ice cream.


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You can picture the ghosts of fans milling around before and during the game.


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Parallel to Michigan Avenue.


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Inside the abandoned Tiger plaza.


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Tiger plaza entrance off Trumbull street.


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This was the OLD visitors team entrance before Tigers plaza was put in. The sign by the visitors clubhouse door said "Visitors clubhouse ABSOLUTLY NO visitors".


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The famous "Corner". A sad ending for a great lady. The area around Tiger stadium is not the best. Plans are being made to clean up Detroit. It's happening slowly, but I can see a change over the last 30 years. You still don't go to downtown Detroit at night unless its for a Tigers game, or Red Wings game. It's pretty much deserted after 5 pm, even on game nights. Quite a few cities have had downtown urban revivals. San Diego where Petco park is, Harborfront in Baltimore where Camden yards is, lowdo in Denver where Coors field is. Lets hope Detroit rises back to the once great city it was.