Baseball Hall of Fame - Cooperstown, New York
Ballparks, Arenas and Stadiums > Baseball Hall of Fame - Cooperstown, New York
MUSIC - Hideaway by the Rippingtons

Photographed in 1976, 1991, and 1995 using film. Shot in 2007 and 2013 using digital.

I am pleased to let you know that the Hall of fame has several of my ballpark photos hanging in the "sacred ground" exhibit on the third floor. It is truly an honor to have my work displayed.

Location: 25 Main Street, Cooperstown, New York

If there is a perfect place, it's Cooperstown New York. Nestled between the Adirondack and Catskill Mountains, Cooperstown is a Norman Rockwell painting come to life. Cooperstown is located about 80 miles west of Albany and 60 miles east of Binghampton New York in Otsego County. The village has shops, restaurants, bed and breakfasts, and of course the National Baseball Hall of Fame

This little hamlet in upstate New York is picturesque. Especially in the fall, when the leaves change and there is a chill in the air. Victorian homes dot the village. There is one stop light in town. Local people seem to know everyone, and they always say hi.

The hall of fame was dedicated on June 12, 1939. The first induction class included some of the all time greats of baseball. Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson and the greatest player of all time Babe Ruth. The hall continued to induct its best players. As of September 2007, there were 282 players, managers, umpires, and builders enshrined in Cooperstown. This years class included Cal Ripken, Jr. of the Baltimore Orioles, and Mr. Padre, Tony Gwynn. Doubleday field is a short walk from the main entrance to the hall of fame.

The hall is a few blocks south of Lake Otsego, often referred as Glimmerglass Lake. The Otesaga hotel is at the south shore of the lake. The Otesaga is where all the hall of famers stay during induction weekend.

Baseball isn't the only reason to come to Cooperstown. Fly Creek is a village about 10 miles west of the hall. They have a cider mill and general store. The Belgian Ommegang brewery is nearby also. Several hotels, motels and bed and breakfasts dot the area. The Glimmerglass opera house is nearby as is the newly restored American hotel. The hotel is located about 30 minutes away in Sharon Springs. There are several hotels, motels and bed and breakfast inns around Cooperstown. I would recommend staying at the Howard Johnson's on route 28. It is brand new and have reasonable prices. The hotel is about 10 minutes south of the village on route 28.

My first trip to Cooperstown was in the summer of 1976, and I have been coming back ever since. Each time I come to Cooperstown, I find something I haven't seen before. The following photos are not just of the hall, but of the surrounding villages and towns.

I highly recommend a visit to the Leatherstocking region of upstate New York. Even if you aren't a baseball fan, Cooperstown is a great place to spend a few days. Bike, golf, hike or just take in the area and the museums. Cooperstown is like you stepped back in time. I will always come back to this jewel in upstate New York.
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Exit 17 off interstate 88. Heading up to Cooperstown. September 1991


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Cooperstown...off I-88 (west/east from Binghampton to Albany) and route 28 .


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Baseball HEAVEN...the hall of fame... 8/13


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My nephew Evan in front of Honus Wagner's locker. 8/13


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Seats from old Connie Mack stadium. 8/13


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Beautiful lake Otsego on a late summer afternoon. 8/13


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The Tunnicliff inn.


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The Johnny Podres / Roy Campanella statues outside the hall of fame. (on the east side). 8/13


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Welcome to the village of Cooperstown New York. September 1991


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Me (with A LOT more hair in July of 1976) at the entrance to the hall of fame. July 1976


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The main entrance in 1991. Sept 1991


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Another view of the entrance. Sept 1991


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The newly renovated main entrance to the hall of fame. September 2007


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25 Main street, Cooperstown New York. Sept 07


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The hall of fame offices. Sept 07


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The view looking east on Main street. Sept 07


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Mickey's place on Main street. A great store for authentic jackets, jersey's and new era caps. You can see at the top of the building that it was built in 1874. Sept 07


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One of the old buildings on Main street in Cooperstown. Sept 07


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The Tunnicliff restaurant and Inn. Located at 34 Pioneer street in Cooperstown. Sept 07


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The village of Cooperstown on a cool September afternoon. Sept 07


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Looking down Main street towards the hall of fame. The hall will be down on your right hand side, behind the trees. Sept 07


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A late summer afternoon at lake Ostego. Sept 07


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Babe Ruth greets you as you enter the hall of fame. Sept 07


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The bambino changed the game in the 20's. His legendary power brought fans to the parks in droves to see him hit home runs. Sept 07


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Ted Williams also greets you as you enter. Sept 07


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Ted Williams, in millions of peoples eyes, was the greatest hitter who ever lived. Had he not lost 5 years to military service, he would have set records that would be untouchable. But his country came first. Sept 07


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Tony Gwynn's jerseys, cap, bat, cleats, and batting helmet. That guy could wake up on Christmas morning and hit a double down the left field line. Sept 07


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Cal Ripken's memorobelia on display at the hall of fame. Sept 07


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The entrance to the hall of fame gallery. Sept 07


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The gallery and the plaques of the hall of famers. Sept 07


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Inside the main gallery. Sept 07


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Tony Gwynn's plaque in the hall. Sept 07


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Tony Gwynn and Cal Ripken Jr. Sept 07


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Seats from the old Polo Grounds in New York. The legendary home of the Giants and Mets was demolished in 1964. Sept 07


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Babe Ruth's bowling ball. The Babe has his own section in Cooperstown. Sept 07


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The bambino, Babe Ruth's locker. I personally think his number 3 should be permanently retired as well as Roberto Clemente's number 21. Sept 07


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Seats from old Connie Mack stadium in Philadelphia. The stadium was demolished in 1976. Sept 07


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Another view of the seats from Connie Mack stadium. Sept 07


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Stan Musial's locker. Sept 07


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This is the entrance to the field of dreams exhibit on the third floor. The picture is of Ebbets Field in Brooklyn. Sept 07


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Lou Gehrig's locker and uniform top. Sept 07


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Joe DiMaggio's locker. Sept 07


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Another view of Joe DiMaggio's locker. Sept 07


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These seats are from the old Met, Metropolitan stadium in Bloomington Minnesota. The onetime home of the Minnesota Twins. The site is now the Mall of America. Sept 07


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Yaz and his jersey in the hall of fame. Sept 07


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Trevor Hoffman's glove, hat and jersey from his record setting 500th save. Sept 07


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A pinwheel and padding from old Comiskey park in Chicago. Sept 07


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This photo of Wrigely field (just below the catchers mitt) is one I took, and the hall decided to display. Sept 07


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The photo in the middle is one of Camden Yards that I took in 1994. Sept 2007


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The cornerstone of old Ebbets Field in Brooklyn. Located in the field of dreams display on the third floor. Sept 07


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These seats are from Dodger stadium in Los Angeles. I remember the old wooden seats at Dodger stadium when I was a kid. Sept 07


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Curt Schilling's bloody sock from the 2004 ALCS. Note to Gary Thorne.... when blood dries it turns BROWN. It is NOT ketchup. Sept 07


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Two statues outside the hall. The late Johnny Podres delivers the pitch to Roy Campanella of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Sept 07


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The statue of Dodger southpaw Johnny Podres. Podres passed away in January of 08. Sept 07


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Ol Campy in the rockin chair! Roy Campanella's statue. Campy passed away in 1993. Sept 07


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Doubleday field 31 years ago. July 1976


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The interior of Doubleday field. July 76


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A view of the diamond at Doubleday. July 76


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Fast forward 31 years and Doubleday hasn't changed that much. Sept 2007


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The birthplace of baseball and the main entrance. Sept 07


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The arched entrance. Sept 07


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The basic seating in the covered grandstand behind home plate. Sept 07


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The field looks basically the same as it did the first time I saw it in 1976. Sept 07


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Lake Ostego as the sun goes down on a cool September evening. 10/95


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You can see why they call it "glimmerglass". Sept 91


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On the way up route 28 to the village. Sept 1991


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More fall foliage on route 28. Sept 1991


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A country barn north of Richfield Springs New York. Oct 95


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A church in Richfield Springs, about 20 miles north of Cooperstown on route 28. October 1995


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Fall colors on route 28 in between Cooperstown and Richfield Springs. Oct 95


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Reds, golds, yellows, and orange colors fill the October sky outside Cooperstown. Oct 95


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A farm in fall. October 1995. I think any baseball fan should make the trek to Cooperstown. Especially in the fall during apple harvest. Many fall festivals are held on the weekends. Cooperstown is one great place left unspoiled by corporations. Lets keep it that way!!! On a scale of 1 to 10, Cooperstown gets a 15.